Vikings (History Channel) Episode 3 “Dispossessed”

History Channel’s new series Vikings episode 3 “Dispossessed” airs on Sunday March 17 at 10 p.m.

Episode Synopsis: Vikings (History Channel) Episode 3 “Dispossessed” – A monastery in Lindesfarne is about to get a firsthand look at how the Vikings operate. In and out in a flurry of violence and terror, Ragnar and his crew raid the monastery for everything it contains from treasure to monks who can be sold as slaves. Unable to ignore the riches this unsanctioned journey has returned, Earl Haraldson has no choice but to agree to let these warriors undertake a second trip out. The west has now been opened for the taking by Ragnar Lothbrok and the world of the Vikings will never be the same

Show Summary: The extraordinary tales of the lives and epic adventures of these warriors are told in VIKINGS, a new nine-part scripted series premiering Sunday, March 3 at 10 p.m. (ET) on HISTORYr. The drama portrays the world of these Dark Age raiders, traders, explorers – not from an outsider’s view, but, through the eyes of Viking society.

While VIKINGS is filled with conflict, warfare and bloodshed – for these were extreme times – it is a family saga at heart. It follows the adventures of Ragnar Lothbrok (Travis Fimmel, The Beast, Baytown Outlaws), a curious, compelling man who is always looking to break through barriers and discover new worlds to conquer. A young farmer and family man, Ragnar is deeply frustrated by the unadventurous policies of his local chieftain, Earl Haraldson (Gabriel Byrne, In Treatment, Usual Suspects, Millers Crossing), who continues to send his Vikings raiders east every summer, to the Baltic states and Russia, whose populations are as materially poor as themselves.

VIKINGS will chart Ragnar’s ambitions to discover civilizations across the great ocean to the west as well as his inevitable conflicts along the way. With the help of his jester friend Floki, (Gustaf Skarsgard, The Way Back), they build a new generation of boats – faster, sleeker and more beautifully crafted than anything else on the sea.

The series will also delve into how the Vikings – the last pagans – worshipped ancient gods like Odin, Thor, Freya and Loki. Ragnar claims to be a direct descendant of the Norse god Odin, who, as well as being the god of warriors slain in battle, is also the god of curiosity.

Joining Fimmel, Byrne and Skarsgard are Katheryn Winnick (Bones, Love and Other Drugs, The Black Marks) as Lagertha, a fierce shield maiden and Ragnar’s wife; Jessalyn Gilsig (Glee, Heroes, Nip/Tuck, Friday Night Lights) as Siggy, Earl Haraldson’s beautiful wife; George Blagden (Les Miserables, Wrath of the Titans) as Athelstan, a young, innocent Christian monk captured by Ragnar on his first raid on England and Clive Standen (Camelot, Robin Hood) as Rollo, Ragnar’s impulsive, wild, care-free brother.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1648383568 Richard Yarus

    Alcuin of York was already in Aachen (the capital of
    Charlemagne’s empire) at the time of the raid on Lindisfarne (England). Alcuin, as we recall from World History
    Class, was asked by the Frank King to run the Palace School in Aachen (France).

    Therefore, without doubt, these Norse Vikings already knew
    of the lands to the west of them, i.e. Jarvic, York, Lindisfarne, etc.

    It is important to note that Lindisfarne Priory was a very
    important place to Alcuin, and it was home to several close friends. Alcuin
    actually wanted to return to Lindisfarne prior to the Viking Raid, but was
    prevented from doing so by Charlemagne. The Frank King wanted Alcuin to stay in
    Aachen and administer the Palace School. The raid on Lindisfarne was more than likely
    a deliberate attack on a fragile Christian Center because Aachen was too well
    defended.

    These facts were well understood by the Vikings and Franks
    of the time. At this period, the Dane
    and Norse Vikings under the rule of Godfred of Hedeby, were upset with (1) Charlemagne’s
    Iron Embargo against them, (2) his ban on Viking ships from entering Frank
    ports, (3) and on his expulsion of Viking Mercenaries from Frank lands. Mercenaries had aided Charlemagne in his
    fight against the Saxons, a common enemy. (4) Additionally, The Dane Vikings
    feared that Charlemagne was about to invade Hedeby and other parts of the then
    Viking land.

    This is covered in Amazon’s e-book, “To Kindle A Fire,” (c)
    1999, a Viking novel by Richard Yarus.