Elementary Season 1 “The Rat Race” Review

Elementary (CBS) Episode 5 The Rat Race

Elementary stepped up the character development this week in “The Rat Race”. The case itself that Sherlock and Watson were called into solve was second to Sherlock himself. The case was a catalyst for the story of Watson and Sherlock to grow, and writer Craig Sweeny did an amazing job.

Jonny Lee Miller did such an outstanding job in “The Rat Race” especially in his scene with Captain Gregson. Instead of being the closed off, snarky Sherlock that he normally is, the hero of Elementary laid out everything for Gregson. It was so sweet and so sobering, and obviously incredibly difficult for Sherlock to tell the Captain about his addiction that I almost felt the need to stand up and applaud Miller as I watched. His struggle to keep Sherlock’s hard exterior, but knowing that he had to come clean was, dare I say, flawless? And heartbreaking? Kudos, Miller. Kudos.

I was pretty surprised with Gregson admitted to knowing about Sherlock’s problems, and relieved for the detective when Gregson was understanding and actually pretty damn supportive. I think Gregson was able to sense that Sherlock had a hard time opening up, which led to the compliment about his skills not slipping at all.

Elementary showed a lot of fun between Watson and Sherlock in this episode as well. While the two seem to grate on each others nerves, the tension seemed to actually decrease this week when Sherlock attempted to get Watson back into the dating scene. It was pretty interesting to watch Watson use her new found detective skills and put together that her date was actually a married man.

“The Rat Race” was an episode of Elementary where every character dropped their walls and became much more open and vulnerable with their counterparts. Well done, Elementary! As the show continues, it really is growing into more than just another procedural crime show, which is what I wanted from the start.

About The Author

When she's not watching horror movies that are instantly streaming on Netflix or reruns of her favorite TV shows, Kelly can be found working on any of the many writing projects she has begun that she will inevitably not finish. She speaks in movie quotes and uses TV/film references in daily conversation; and she does all of this while attempting to change the world’s negative opinion of fangirls.